food and beverage underground

Restaurant Security Will Save You Money and Possibly Lives

As the holidays approach extra emphasis should be put on your restaurant security. Not only do shoppers come out
during the holiday’s unfortunately so do the criminals. Reviewing your restaurants security plan with your staff is a must. Here is a list of guidelines that you should follow:

  1. Once the food and beverage establishment is emptied of guests make sure the management locks all the exterior doors and sets your alarm system to stay.
  2. Never count or collect money in front of open windows or doors with windows that can be seen from the outside.
  3. Turn on all exterior lighting
  4. Make sure that employees leave in groups, never solo. Criminals target food and beverage employees, as they are aware that they usually leave with cash.
  5. Do not make night deposits. If you have to make night deposits most city police departments have some type of program that you can arrange for a police escort.
  6. Do not keep all of your restaurant deposits in your safe over the entire weekend as most restaurant hold ups are done on either Saturday or Sunday nights. The criminals are obviously aware of when the money is there.
  7. Above all else, if the worst happens and a criminal breaks into the building inform every staff member that they are to cooperate completely and not try to be a hero. Give them the money, you are insured and nothing is worth the possibility of getting one of your people seriously hurt or even killed.

Preventative Measures

Criminals look for unsecured or easy targets and have often cased the area for places that fit the bill prior to attempting and actions. With this in mind there are several steps you can take to increase your restaurant security. The following is a list of preventative measures you should take now.

  1. Exterior lighting – Criminals like the dark so inspecting your property to make sure it can be well lit when desired is the largest deterrent to criminal action. Even if you do not want to change the aesthetics of the way your building looks during service hours you still need the ability to light all areas around your building when you are closed.
  2. Cameras – Both exterior and interior cameras are one of the best ways to deter the would-be criminals. With the price of systems on the market today you would be foolish not to protect yourself with this. At the very least false cameras can also be purchased and mounted. This is less effective to say the least, but it still may deter many.
  3. Alarm System – I am taking it for granted that you have some type of alarm system, but if you do not GET ONE! Even “safe” areas can turn bad quick.
  4. Make sure all of your windows and doors are secure and the locks are solid.
  5. Make sure back service access doors are steel and have a peephole look out.
  6. Get a safe that is of the drop type and is set for time opening. This will make it impossible to get into when you do not want it accessed.
  7. Get involved with your local police department and make sure they are aware of your closing time and regular routine. Getting on their routine route can be the cheapest and most effective restaurant security measure.
  8. Review your restaurant security measures with all of your staff on a regular basis.

Unfortunately restaurants are targeted all too often because of the available cash that is available. It is up to you though to make sure you have done all you can to protect your staff, and your property. The holiday season may be the peak of criminal activity, but it is a constant threat so get on a regular restaurant security program and keep things secure! Have a safe holiday season!

WHOLESALE SECURITY EQUIPMENT
From Restaurant Security to Restarant Press


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